Going to music gigs is a very, very healthy habit.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Gandalfe, May 2, 2018.

  1. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    Attending music gigs is one way to relieve stress and be social. It may also be a great way to add years to your life. Which is great news to most of the people reading this article.

    O2 and Goldsmith University Associate Lecturer Patrick Fagan published the unexpected results. Fagan specializes in behavioral science, and headed into the study understanding the positive impact of communal arts experiences. What the data started showing, however, was pretty shocking.

    According to the study, experiencing a gig for just 20 minutes can result in a 21% increase in feelings of well-being. Furthermore, the research found a direct link between “high levels of well-being and a lifespan increase of nine years” or more.

    Of course, that’s up to a decade of extra living. If you’re aged 107, heading out to gigs every night won’t extend you to 116. But it does means that younger fans can effectively boost their life expectancies by indulging in the positive behavior. That is, provided they abstain from seriously harmful drugs, high-risk activities, and have generally healthy habits.

    The life extension estimate wasn’t a random guess. Psychometric testing and heart-rate tests were given to the participants of the study. Results showed that the participants increased their feelings of self-worth (25%), closeness to others (25%) and mental stimulation (75%) when they attended gigs.

    Read more: https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2018/03/28/music-concert-gigs-nine-years/
     
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  2. JazzMystic

    JazzMystic

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    Once again you've given great information and inspiration. "Music is Medicine" for sure.
     
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  3. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    The article doesn't really define "play a gig" or "listen to a gig." I think it's more the latter. I can and do enjoy both, though, but large medium small any size crowds tend to drain me. However, if I think about it, I have considerably less of a problem if I'm playing or singing in a band/choir. Hmmm.
     
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  4. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    I need to to do both, I enjoy playing more where 2 hours seems like five minutes to me.
     
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  5. Groovekiller

    Groovekiller Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

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    There's another side to this when you are actually performing. Show up very, very early to gigs. You won't be the only one. Drummers and musicians with heavy equipment will also be there.
    Some may think this is a waste of time, but consider these advantages:

    You will never ever be late. Those of us who live in big cities, or perform at crowded venues, or have to drive a long way or in traffic will benefit greatly.

    Also, and the part that relates to this thread, is you will have more time to hang out with friends and make new friends. You already have a lot in common, so you'll probably have a good time. Many of the finest musicians I know consider the "hang" to be as enjoyable as the gig.

    The top woodwind doubler in my area was famous for telling his students "If you are on time, you're late."
     
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  6. saxhound

    saxhound Moderator Staff Member CE/Moderator

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    I've got to agree, although before the gig for me usually meant two hours of setting up the PA and testing everything. Many of my Chicago area bands would go out for "early breakfast" after the gig. Lots of fun, jokes and camaraderie. We would lose track of time and someone would finally say - OMG, it's 5 AM - I've got to get home because I have another gig tomorrow.
     
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  7. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    Solution: if the gig/practice is supposed to start at 5:30, tell folks that they need to get there at 5. I've only done that about a half-dozen times.

    I have a somewhat different perspective on this because I've always tried to be the guy that's helping moving/setting up stuff and/or was getting paid to set up/move stuff, so I was almost always early. I generally didn't have to do that much in my last stint, which was in a choir, so I volunteered to pick up folks that would otherwise not have come.
     
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