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Boosey & Hawkes 1-10 & 2-20

I picked up this B&H 1-10 kinda on a whim, just because it looked like a challenge to get working. I repadded it, and actually it has a really nice tone to it. Quite a bit warmer than my Buescher Aristocrat, and the key work is really nice. It took a little getting used to(the keys are a bit crowded compared to the Buescher), and I am still working out a couple bugs. But I am really digging the UK horn.

I have a wooden 2-20 coming also, with two wooden bells. That should be quite a bit more of a challenge, but at least I'll have a B&H bell on the 1-10. I'm also looking forward to using the techniques I've read here from the experts in terms of crack repair.

All in all not a bad couple of projects, and I happen to get a barrel in a lot that fits the 1-10 nicely and has matching rings.
 
I'll have to keep my eye's open(for a 926), they seem to be a bargain, if you are willing and able to fix them. From the serial number, my 1-10 is a '66, yet the keywork is much better thought out and accomplished than my '78 Buescher(admidtedly a selmer student in disguise). I haven't gotten the 2-20 yet, hopefully I can salvage it.
 

Steve

Clarinet CE/Moderator
Staff member
CE/Moderator
There is a gigantic difference between student and intermediate / professional keywork in general for clarinets. In vintage instruments on can generally tell just by keywork alone (forget about the body) if it is a student or int/pro instrument. The thickness of the rings, straight key arms versus swoops which allows on to adjust them, polishing/finishing behind the keys, etc.

The BH 2-20s are more like stencils of their higher cost brethen ... if I recall them correctly. BHs are quite infrequent in the US.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
I have a wooden 2-20 coming also, with two wooden bells. That should be quite a bit more of a challenge, but at least I'll have a B&H bell on the 1-10. I'm also looking forward to using the techniques I've read here from the experts in terms of crack repair.
I think you'll be in for a lot of frustration on the cracks. Generally, when you see an eBay'er specifically say, "Some cracks," you're probably going to get a horn that's been used in batting practice.
 

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
Still...

...if one is bent on do it yourself horn repair experience, where better to start on a clarinet that may be beyond ultimate salvation. Better to drill and fill on a "junker", than to do your learning on something worth keeping.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
...if one is bent on do it yourself horn repair experience, where better to start on a clarinet that may be beyond ultimate salvation. Better to drill and fill on a "junker", than to do your learning on something worth keeping.
I definitely +1 this post.

In my opinion, though, it's generally better to work from "easy problem" to "difficult problem," so you don't get overwhelmingly frustrated. As an example from the computer tech world I live in, I'd rather someone start me off with, "Replace the hard drive in this Dell Latitude D630," which is an operation that takes maybe 2 minutes and you have all of three or four screws to deal with, rather than, "Replace the hard drive in this snow iBook," an operation that takes me -- and I've done about a dozen of 'em and I've got 5,000 years experience -- an hour and 1/2 and you've got at least a dozen screws to contend with.
 
...if one is bent on do it yourself horn repair experience, where better to start on a clarinet that may be beyond ultimate salvation. Better to drill and fill on a "junker", than to do your learning on something worth keeping.

Exactly. I've fixed the easy one, the 1-10. Every woodwind repair book I've started to read began by stating "Do not start working on a good instrument. Find a junker to learn on." Just like when I studied auto mechanics, you don't "learn" by servicing a Jaguar(one of the worst cars in the world to work on), you learn on a beat up Chevy or Ford. That is how we learn not to 'eff up a good car. Same-same with woodwinds, or anything else I have learned to repair. $20 well spent in my opinion, cheap mistake at worst.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Selmer raffle advertisement from the 1970's:

Win an alto saxophone - no fee to enter!

First Prize: a new Selmer Mark VII alto

Second Prize: two new Selmer Mark VII altos
Boo, hiss.

Terry, if you have a Mark VII or two you'd like to get rid of, I'll take 'em. Even if you have to throw in an alto clarinet, too.
 
Got the 2-20 today, upper joint is nice, but missing a trill key and I don't have the right one for a spare. I'll go to a couple local shops and see if I can trade for the right part. I could probably use the one on the 1-10. One bell is perfect, and mounted on my 1-10 now. I really didn't expect the tone to be much better, but it does sound more full than the Vito plastic bell. The other bell has a nice crack, which was unsuccessfully repaired with some kind of cyanoacrylate. I'll have to try and fix it a little better. Lower joint may be a lost cause. It does have some cracks, one obviously through a tone hole. I'll play around with it, try and learn some technics. *Shrug* all in all $40 total for a nice playing 1-10 with a wood 2-20 bell is still not to bad. Plus the learning/practice and spare parts.
 
I picked up this B&H 1-10 kinda on a whim, just because it looked like a challenge to get working. I repadded it, and actually it has a really nice tone to it. Quite a bit warmer than my Buescher Aristocrat, and the key work is really nice. It took a little getting used to(the keys are a bit crowded compared to the Buescher), and I am still working out a couple bugs. But I am really digging the UK horn.

I have a wooden 2-20 coming also, with two wooden bells. That should be quite a bit more of a challenge, but at least I'll have a B&H bell on the 1-10. I'm also looking forward to using the techniques I've read here from the experts in terms of crack repair.

All in all not a bad couple of projects, and I happen to get a barrel in a lot that fits the 1-10 nicely and has matching rings.

I have played on BH clarinets for the whole of my career and have always found them to be excellent. I now use a pair of Symphony 10-10s and have an Imperial 926 as a back-up. They all date from around 1968 to 1970 and still play perfectly.
 
The first horn I ever worked on was a silver-plated Conn Wonder tenor saxophone; I got to learn everything, including patching holes where it was corroded through...I learned about making and tightening keywork, straightening parts, dent work, lots of soldering, etc...it cleaned up well and was my main horn for a long time...even got the little alt Eb working correctly.

In all honesty, however, I am an ex-machinist and was a working electronics guy for many years. I started in the repair business about 20 years...you can see the pictures HERE
 

Carl H.

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
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