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How to use Klose book (Clarinet)?

Lifelong sax player here who doubles pretty well on flute but never quite got the hang of clarinet after years of dabbling on and off. I'm still very slow at reading the lower register since it's different from sax. I can get across the break pretty well. I also need to work on C#-G above the staff. Other than being kind of a slow reader, my tone, embouchure and technique are pretty good. I'm sure if I really buckle down and put in the time, I'll get it. But I want to take the most efficient approach going through this book.

I have a PDF of the Klose method (Klose's Conservatory Method for the Clarinet, 191 pages) and have gotten through the first 50 pages or so. My question, is the Klose book written in a way that a beginner can just go straight through the book, or should I skip around to concentrate on certain basic skills/exercises first or in a certain order (alluded to above). If I should skip around, what exercises/pages should I concentrate on first, and then what order as I progress?

Big question I know, but am hoping some teachers out there have some approaches already mapped out that they wouldn't mind sharing.

Thanks
 
I guess I'll answer my own question. It's probably best to just go straight through the Klose book. But I think Rubank is better for a beginner like me. I'll work my way through all the Rubanks and use Klose for sight reading practice and to drill certain keys.
 
I used to break out Klose to practice reading clarinet before playing a HS pit orchestra gig. At the beginning of Covid, I decided to practice "better" so I purchased and read through the Hite edited Baermann Foundation Studies book. I read that Baermann would be good to get under the fingers before working on the 32 Rose Etudes. I did a few etudes but lost interest as we came out of the worst of Covid. I think I need to go back to the scale studies again...

I mostly play bass clarinet, so I really need to work on playing down to low C. Even after playing BC as a main instrument for 7+ years, I still think in sax.
 
As a doubler I play scales/arpeggios on my clarinet plus use these three books:




The Kell is great for articulation, Taffanel is great for everything, and the Chesky is good for intervals.
(Try playing the page of 5th's for about an hour, when I do, my fingers feel great...kinda like Yoga on clarinet)
 
Thanks to all for the advice and book suggestions. In the week since my first post, I've been practicing a lot, finishing the Rubank Elementary and Intermediate books and getting a third of the way through the Klose book. So I'm now about the level of a middle schooler in terms of technique, which is good enough to get me through my doubling gigs coming up, which luckily don't require any improv on clarinet. I think I'm off to a good start at least and will check out some of those books, starting with the Rose etudes since I found a free copy of that PDF, then save up my gig money for the rest.
 
Rose was too hard for me at first. Then I read that it helps to do Baermann first, so I did. Most of Rose is musically melodic which is nice. There is a CD accompianment for Rose but it is too fast for mere mortals. I use Audacity to slow them down.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Thanks to all for the advice and book suggestions. In the week since my first post, I've been practicing a lot, finishing the Rubank Elementary and Intermediate books and getting a third of the way through the Klose book. So I'm now about the level of a middle schooler in terms of technique, which is good enough to get me through my doubling gigs coming up, which luckily don't require any improv on clarinet. I think I'm off to a good start at least and will check out some of those books, starting with the Rose etudes since I found a free copy of that PDF, then save up my gig money for the rest.
Note that you might be able to find all/most of these online. There are some public libraries that have extensive music selections. There are also some universities where you can get a library card. Arizona State University (ASU) is close-ish to me and I have (a really old) library card for their music library. There's also interlibrary loan.

Just trying to save you some $.
 
I don't really agree that the Klose is a "straightforward" read. It certainly is through the first section of basic exercises, and a bit into the finger exercises section. But somewhere into that second section, you start getting diminishing returns without using other material.

What I would do with the Klose is this... get a big colorful bookmark to place at the start of each section, and kind of consider each section a different method. Bascially, within each section, it does a certain thing, and takes you up all the skill levels from beginning to expert. So, as a beginner, it's probably best to work on the first 2-3 exercises in each section... instead of trying to work through an entire section at once.

This is pretty much how all the old school methods work. Baermann is good, and one called the Magnani Method as well, (you can find both of them for free on IMSLP) but again, for both of these you should bookmark each section and treat it separately in your progress.

I actually prefer the Lazarus method (book 1) above all of the old school methods as far as actually providing a wealth of intermediate material. They only have Books 2 and 3 on IMSLP, so you'll have to go out and buy a copy.
 
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