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Minimizing airiness

I own a used beginner's flute. No obvious problems. No bent keys, no pad leaks, keys close in unison with no slop, tone is good (checked it against my tuner).

A couple of keys have a little side to side motion. The foot joint isn't as tight as it should be, but it's a used flute.

No matter what I try, I just can't control the airiness.

After some finessing, I found the sweet spot ... just too much airiness. I've moved my lips hoping to gain improve air flow through the mouth hole. I've moved it close to my body, away from my body, raised it, and lowered it. Tried combinations. Still good tone (based on tuner), but airy.

I've been playing long tones in front of my mirror to check my embouchure. I didn't see any glaring problems. I've played triads, sevenths, major and minor scales.

I'd pull my hair out if I had any hair to pull out.

Is there a way that I determine if it's me or the instrument? Thanks.
 
My guess is that your aperture is not small enough.
Try this: using only the headjoint, wave it around for a minute (to cool it off a few degrees from room temperature).
In front of a (bathroom?) mirror, play a steady tone for several beats, on just the headjoint...while doing so look at the lip plate to see the condensation your air produces. There should be a small "triangle" of moisture (widest at the hole then tapering to a point farther away from the hole).

If you have a good "triangle" your air is going in the right place... If the area of moisture is not a triangle then you aperture (the hole between your lips) is too big.
* If you are mainly a clarinetist/saxophonist you will need to concentrate on making the aperture with the "inside" (soft red tissue) of your lips. If you use the outside of your lips the hole (aperture) cannot get small enough..

Overtones are your friend!
 
My guess is that your aperture is not small enough.
Try this: using only the headjoint, wave it around for a minute (to cool it off a few degrees from room temperature).
In front of a (bathroom?) mirror, play a steady tone for several beats, on just the headjoint...while doing so look at the lip plate to see the condensation your air produces. There should be a small "triangle" of moisture (widest at the hole then tapering to a point farther away from the hole).

If you have a good "triangle" your air is going in the right place... If the area of moisture is not a triangle then you aperture (the hole between your lips) is too big.
* If you are mainly a clarinetist/saxophonist you will need to concentrate on making the aperture with the "inside" (soft red tissue) of your lips. If you use the outside of your lips the hole (aperture) cannot get small enough..

Overtones are your friend!
I did as you suggested using only the headjoint. I don't get a triangle, I get an ellipse.
 
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