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Boehm system oboe

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
#3
Is it probably in the key of C? Does that mean it has the same fingering as the clarinet?
That'd mean the fingerings are simular to sax and clarinet. It should be in the key of C.

http://www.lemis.com/grog/oboe.html (Evette & Schaeffer Bohem Oboe)

Wikipedia said:
A variant form using large tone holes; the Boehm system oboe, was never in common use, though it was used in some military bands in Europe into the 20th century.
 
Likes: Ed

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#5
First, using the term "Boehm system" to refer to any instrument except the flute is a misnomer. The only instrument to which T. Boehm ever applied his "system" was the flute. Others (including Klose, in the case of the clarinet, and Sax, in the case of just about everything else) used the base work of Boehm to apply remote operation of keys through rings and axles on musical instruments. A somewhat more than minor point, and one that periodically needs to be made.

Second, a "Boehm" oboe would only finger in the same fashion as a clarinet if some incredibly complicated keywork was involved. Due to the cylindrical bore (roughly so, but lets not quibble), the clarinet and members of its family over-blow to the twelfth, not to the octave. So, you could have one register of your Boehm style oboe fingering that would mirror the clarinet, but all of the rest of the instrument would be "off" by the requisite number of semi-tones. Not nice and regular like flute and saxophone players are used to (within limits) but what can you do, repeal the laws of physics?
 
Likes: Ed

Steve

Clarinet CE/Moderator
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#6
Weren't those commonly called "ring key" or open hole oboes ?

From what little I know is that Ring key oboes do not have as many options for trills as the Gillet (plateau) models which gained popularity in the 1970s. The keywork has some general shortcomings such as some trills won't be well tuned and some almost impossible (such as a G#-A trill).

Also, since the player now has to cover the entire hole the wider finger spacing can cause problems as some people find the finger spread too much on several keys.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
#7
Steve casted Threadus Resurrectus!

I don't know much about oboes, but, referring to SOTSDO's comment, Moennig did make an instrument called the Saxoboe: a metal oboe with saxophone fingerings. It's more uncommon than rare. I've seen several.

Doing a quick Google search to see if any of these things are currently for sale, I came across this article about the Loree oboe with sax fingerings -- which also talks about the Boehm Buffet-Crampon oboe.

Quoting the article's footnotes: "The term 'Boehm fingering' is often applied (by analogy to the Boehm 1832 flute) to any woodwind keywork that produces F as 1234 and F# as 123-5."
 

Steve

Clarinet CE/Moderator
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#8
Steve casted Threadus Resurrectus!
I've had to bring my oboe chops back to reality lately thus I'm now perusing the double reed section.


Doing a quick Google search to see if any of these things are currently for sale, I came across this article about the Loree oboe with sax fingerings -- which also talks about the Boehm Buffet-Crampon oboe.

Quoting the article's footnotes: "The term 'Boehm fingering' is often applied (by analogy to the Boehm 1832 flute) to any woodwind keywork that produces F as 1234 and F# as 123-5."
That's an interesting Loree info. I thought I came across that sax-oboe like instrument recently on eBay. I was perusing oboes and saw one that had the long RH pinky keys - i thought it was an illusion from the angle of the picture but who knows now.

Now I'm going to pay more attention to it.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
#9
idrs.org has a lot of interesting articles. I wish that the respective saxophone and clarinet (oh, I'll include flute, too) societies had the same.
 
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