Clarinet Vibrato ~ take two

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Gandalfe, Dec 27, 2017.

  1. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    143
    I hate my clarinet vibrato sound. I don't spend enough time on the instrument to get a really good sound, but it shouldn't be that hard to get a klezmer sound. I teach sax vibrato, to so many people. Believe it or not, the reason I teach it to so many saxophonists is because of the many, many times we are required to double a flute or oboe in concert band. A slight (very slight) classical vibrato can help with the inherent intonation challenges of that kind of double.

    So I need to research this and that will be my January 2018 project. How close to the Eddie Daniels sound can I get. The sad part is that many of the saxophonists that I have taught to use vibrato, especially for soloing in a concert band, now do it better than me!!! Just goes to show you that I'm not practicing enough.
     
    Tags:
    TrueTone likes this.
  2. Groovekiller

    Groovekiller Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    877
    Likes Received:
    25
    When I use vibrato on clarinet, I change my embouchure. If I'm playing "legit" clarinet I use a standard 66 mm barrel with a firm lip and blow "at" the reed, keeping the clarinet aimed at the floor.
    For vibrato, I use a shorter barrel, up to 3 mm shorter. Then I play clarinet a little bit more like saxophone, looser, which brings the pitch down. Then I have more freedom to manipulate the vibrato and still be in tune.
     
    Gandalfe and TrueTone like this.
  3. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    143
    I've heard that many saxophone players starting to play clarinet start on a short barrel until they figure the thing out. This was my first video to help and it calmed me down as it is the same method that I use to teach sax vibrato:



    Of course I had to check in on what Eddie Daniels had to say. He was the first clarinetist I had my wife listen to as she started playing jazz for the first time. There are so many Eddie Daniel vids out there! I started with this one:

     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
    TrueTone likes this.
  4. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    10,654
    Likes Received:
    383
    The Nearness of You

    Just so folks know what the gentleman in the first video was talking about ...

    ==========

    Partial thread hijack: I switched from clarinet to sax, rather than the opposite. I was not necessarily a "good" clarinetist before I switched. However, I've only had two teachers comment to me about anything vibrato (and what's with the VEE-brato vs. VYY-brato?):

    * A little goes a long way.
    * Use vibrato to make your tone more interesting, especially on long notes.

    I was looking at a couple of things before I posted this thread. I first came across this Lawrence Welk clip from 1955. There's a tune that starts at 9:16 or so that Welk introduces as "The Swan." The reed section uses almost no vibrato at all when playing clarinets and extremely wide when playing saxophones.

    Second, when I think vibrato, I almost always think vocal, first, because singing with vibrato feels very natural, especially when you're either running out of breath or having a bit of a problem nailing the intonation. This dude has a really nice vocal lesson regarding singing straight vs. with vibrato. He also sings Autumn Leaves completely straight, which is very unique.

    Anyhow, singing a note without vibrato can sound extremely good, especially when you're talking very early (church) music.

    One final thing, not really related to the above. One of the comments in Tallis' "Spem in Alium" mentions there's an interesting "art" installation piece by Janet Cardiff. Please check out the link. Exceptional. (Virtual walk through link.)
     
    TrueTone likes this.
  5. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    143
    Speaking of no vibrato, my MJJO has some Les and Larry Elgart charts. They were a band made up of mostly legit players that were, as some said, the last successful big band. So no vibrato in the reed section, or very little. When we have subs, we have NO VIBRATO written at the top of those charts. Wanna hear how that sounds, I'm glad you asked here are two Elgart charts as we played them for our 2014 recording:

    - Paradise
    - The Continental

    Enjoy.
     
    TrueTone likes this.
  6. retread

    retread

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    36
    Very tight and tasty, Gandalfe. I always thought the Elgart charts were more challenging than most in the book.
     
  7. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    143
    @retread, do you know of a source for Elgart charts? They are hard to find.
     
  8. retread

    retread

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    36
    I played for a leader who had been collecting charts since the Korean War (or police action, if you prefer). He had a wide variety, including Elgart, stuff he had come across over the decades. He even came across a book of all-tenor hotel band arrangements. We tried it once and he relegated it to the never again bin.

    So no, I don't know of a source.
     
    TrueTone likes this.
  9. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    143
    I know one of the brothers is still alive and well in Florida. Maybe I need to go visit him?
     

Share This Page

Our staff's websites:


Loading...