Does anyone recognize this instrument?

Discussion in '... And Others' started by wanabe, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. wanabe

    wanabe

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  2. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    It looks a lot like a Chinese instrument called a "Suona." The difference, obviously, is that the pictures of all the Suonas I've seen have a double-reed mouthpiece.

    It's also possible it's one of the "reed instruments - pipe"-class things that were mainly patented in the 1920s by a variety of US manufactures, most notably Conn and Buescher. I remember seeing an awful lot of patent drawings that are similar to what's in the ad.
     
  3. kymarto

    kymarto Content Expert/Moderator Staff Member CE/Moderator

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    Looks like a suon'a, but it has some differences. This type of instrument is also used in other asian countries, and my guess that this one is eurasian, but from exactly where I don't know. It appears that the owner found a single-reed mouthpiece for oboe and fitted it. The mouthpiece is worth a lot more than the instrument.
     
  4. MrDibbs

    MrDibbs

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    It tells you what it is at the bottom of the ad. Extra information added so it probably wasn't there originally. It says it's a Masonic Shriner Al Kader Oriental Parade Musette Horn.

    That meant nothing to me. I googled it. It's wierd.

    [video=youtube;PKPzoUV8oWI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKPzoUV8oWI[/video]
     
  5. SOTSDO

    SOTSDO Old King Log Staff Member CE/Moderator

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    Ah, the Shrine band. Never was there a more random and slapdash operation than a Shriner group.

    For a while back in the 1990s, I played with a group that was headed up by a Shriner. Among the members were two of his fellow Shriners, and they generally played a quarter beat off of whatever was being led by the drummer.

    They were also big on drinking. He had a private cabinet at the old union hall, in which was kept an assortment of booze, all of which was supplied by someone other than the leader. (The leader also had a bad habit of taking some of the stash home for his own use.)

    In any event, we would play for a hour, then there would be a booze break, and then there was a random second half of the rehearsal. Lots of wasted time, people playing at the wrong place and all of that.

    I don't deny that the Shriner organization does a lot of good with their hospital for the injured children. However, there's a lot of shenanigans going on around that effort.
     

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