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Glissando Headjoint

Discussion in 'The Flute Family: General Discussion' started by Gandalfe, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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  2. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    First, Robert Dick mentions something like, "... Everything that came out on records was something that no one ever heard before; it was all brand new!" I'll just say that "new" doesn't necessarily equal "good".

    Not that I'm ripping on the headjoint. I think it's an interesting concept. I also think it'd sound kewl for some jazz charts.

    Now, the flute that Mr. Dick has looks like it has a few other customizations added to it. I don't know if that makes a difference.

    Here's a quoter from his website: "Made in China by the remarkable Eastman Musical Instrument Company, the new Glissando Headjoint® is designed to pair with the Amadeus Flute, but it can be fit to virtually any flute."

    The Amadeus flute is a "lower priced" flute from Haynes. Kessler music is supposed to have them, as well as two other stores closer to me. I wonder if they know this, because the flute isn't listed on their websites :).

    EDIT: I did some other brief searching. Reports indicate that the headjoint will be in the $2,000 range. I see that the Amadeus flute ranges in the $1300 to $2800 range (there are several models).
     
  3. fox

    fox

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    It looks interesting. Yet, it seems as if it would be limited to a very select few musicians that would use it on very rare occasions.

    I'm more interested in seeing how it works. To me it looks like one of those magic tricks
     
  4. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    Looking closely at the video, it looks like the headjoint is extra long and the lip plate slides from the "normal" position (where the lip plate would be on a normal flute, that is) to 6" or so to your left (as you're playing).

    Further, it looks like the headjoint has a "collapsable" portion (think radio antennas) that slides along a track from "normal" position to that 6" or so to your left -- I think Robert Dick said it changed any note to one a major 2nd lower or something like that.

    I think the mechanical part is probably the easiest to do. The hard part would be getting the flute to still play in tune.

    Here's the acoustic issue: the Glissando headjoint is just dropping the relative pitch of a note by that major 2nd (or whatever) when it's extended to the full length. However, that wouldn't change your C flute into a D flute because the only part of your horn that's being extended is the headjoint. If you wanted to really convert a C flute into a D flute you have to change the distance between the toneholes and/or the size of the toneholes and/or the bore dimensions of the entire instrument. It's essentially the same discussion about why you can't change a high pitch saxophone into a low pitch one by soldering on a neck extension. The extension may help, but it wouldn't fix the problem that a whole lotta notes will play outta tune.

    Considering that you're intentionally detuning a note or notes with the Glissando and that's the effect you want, there's no problem. However, I'm willing to bet that someone's going to buy it for the reason I mentioned earlier -- turning a C flute into a D flute -- and he's going to be very disappointed with the result.
     
  5. SOTSDO

    SOTSDO Old King Log Staff Member CE/Moderator

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    It seems that coupling the lip plate to some part of the player's body would be a bit - er - "problematic". There's precious little "grip" on a Boehm flute with things the way that they are now - getting a grip on the lip plate would only seem to make that worse.
     
  6. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    Yah. I mentioned that Robert Dick's flute looked like it had some additional customizations. I wonder if one of those is a thumbrest. That'd make using the Glissando a whole lot easier.

    Going only by the video, you've got these two metal "sliders/holders" -- going back to the antenna analogy, I had something that looked about the same for UHF on my B/W TV -- that are around your jaw. Obviously, Mr. D forgot that 99% of marketing is making the product look cool. :D
     
  7. Groovekiller

    Groovekiller Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

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    Finally, finally, finally, a musical instrument gimmick that I do not want to buy. I'm a sucker for gimmicks, but now I can save my money for the all important "Rectal circular breathing training CD."
     
  8. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    I'm glad that's not on DVD, Groove. :p
     
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