Is this any good? It seems so...but I'm not sure.

Discussion in 'Clarinet Makes and Models' started by Count Chocula, Dec 3, 2015.

  1. Count Chocula

    Count Chocula

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    Hi! I just bought this, I'll try to overhaul it and give it to a flute-playing relative as a Christmas gift. But whatever, do you have any info? I've been searching and it looks like Carl Fischer imported clarinets under his brand, some were good and others not so much.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Carl-Fischer-B-Flat-Clarinet-/272035196954?

    Even the smallest bit of info counts, so don't be shy!

    Thank you very much! :)
     
  2. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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  3. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    Carl Fischer (hereafter, "CF") was an importer and reseller. They didn't make any instruments. I'd say that the overwhelming majority of saxophones that CF imported were Evette-Schaeffer, Buffet-Crampon models. I know that CF imported some Buffet clarinets, as well as several other manufacturers. I also must say that the case looks like an old Buffet case. Of course, you can buy a case separately, so that doesn't necessarily indicate anything. One comment I read said that CF resold some Pruefer clarinets and some of those had the top joint (read "section") lined with nickel-silver. That's be an easy way to identify! Just look in the joint.

    * If you can find a serial number, that'd be helpful. There may be one on each joint of the horn and they may or may not match. The serial number may be fairly faint.
    * If you can find a stamp that says, "Made in [Place]," that'd be helpful.

    I've also gotta say that the Bundy mouthpiece you have there looks astonishingly like the one I used when I hated playing clarinet and didn't know you could get a different mouthpiece. :)

    On the topic of "restoration," if you have any pins, bands or cracks, that's a sign of, "Probably not."

    I should also ask, why are you wanting to get a flute player a clarinet?

    ==========

    Carl Fischer also imported a lot of high pitch instruments. High pitch is an older intonation standard. That essentially means that the horn will not play in tune with modern instruments and cannot be made to play in tune. On the CF sax imports I've seen, it's going to have "LP" ("low pitch," the modern intonation standard) or "HP" stamped on it. You might also see "low," "high," "H," or "L."
     
  4. Mojo

    Mojo

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    Does your flute-playing relative want a clarinet?
     
  5. Count Chocula

    Count Chocula

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    I hope so!
     
  6. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    Buying a musician an instrument is a dicey proposition in my book. Helping them to buy one can be a much better experience. I have had a number of family/relatives buy me a cheap instrument that I *never* used. I am really picky about what I will put time and effort into.
     
  7. pete

    pete Brassica Oleracea Staff Member Administrator

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    Obje d'art.

    To expand a little on Jim's comment, I often get people asking me if instrument X is a good thing to buy for their relative that's going to be studying music in college or is going to be playing professionally. I try to steer the conversation to, "While I'm sure your [insert relative/significant other] would appreciate the gesture, if you're a pro or going to be a pro, chances are fairly good that you'll have a specific instrument in mind for a specific purpose, because you've either already played one or done a bit of research and have determined it's the one to get." It's not [relative/significant other] being spoiled. Well, usually not. It's generally that the buyER doesn't really know enough about the instrument in question and might end up buying something completely unsuitable. It's like you're trying to buy someone a pair of shoes and you don't know what size and what purpose those shoes are for. A size 8 ballerina shoe isn't going to be very good for me when I'm playing rugby. (Not that I play rugby and a size 8 is rather small on me.)

    I mention elsewhere that my sister is a flute player. I think it might be nice to buy her one of those Hall's Crystal Flutes as a decoration thingy and/or as a shiny toy, but not as a "real" instrument.

    However, if you do want to send me instruments, please do. I'll turn around and post 'em on eBay. I could use some extra cash. You can make a lovely planter out of a tuba ....
     
  8. Count Chocula

    Count Chocula

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    Hi! it's for my nephew. The kid has been playing flute for 4-5 years, so I thought it would be nice to introduce him to the clarinet. I don't know, probably he'll hate it!. Just trying to get him to play other instruments.

    I've been analizing the pics and I see literally nothing that I could learn from about pitch, year, model etc. Weird.


    There was no description, just this; "used, needs pads from what I was told" so, this was a bit of a blind purchase. I'm quite wary of it given that the other clarinet I got for myself some weeks ago had some shallow cracks that were not listed in the description and I'm having real trouble sealing them. I live in this snobby city where even the most common musical thing is hard to find, read, they have to order 1mm cork sheets from Germany. Sadly hilarious.

    Well, I'll see how it unravels!

    Sorry for the subpar english, I'm working on it haha.

    Thank you very much for your time! Much appreciated :)
     

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