Looking for help with condition of sax and repair options (if needed)

Discussion in 'Saxophones' started by Kiwi1, Nov 10, 2016.

  1. Kiwi1

    Kiwi1

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    I recently obtained a King Zephyr (1957) and it has brown spots on it, the largest being twice the size of my thumb. It looks a little like rust and is some what scratchy to touch, it feels the same level as the rest of the metal. I am curious what it likely is and whether I need to be concerned, or do anything about it. Aesthetically I am not concerned at all and feel it adds to the character of the horn. I have included a couple of images, thank you for any help!!
    Thank you!
     

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  2. JfW

    JfW

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    Most of the time this type of oxidation is superficial and I think it is here. You can have someone spot-lacquer the area, but I think that's probably a terrible idea as I'm not sure how aesthetically successful that would end up.

    It's a sixty year old horn. Enjoy the "character".
     
  3. Steve

    Steve Clarinet CE/Moderator Staff Member CE/Moderator

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    as mentioned it's just normal oxidation, also known as patina / tarnish.

    If you prefer it more shiny you can use brasso and polish up the spots. I've read, though never tried, that dish washing stuff will clean it up too, though it still needs to be polished afterwards.

    Normally brass instruments were generally "gold" color lacquered (paint stuff), or silver plated.
    Nowadays horns are sold "raw" and the owners generally like to have it patina over time.

    Personally, I like it polished or lacquered over :)
     
  4. Kiwi1

    Kiwi1

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    Thank you for the advice, appreciate the piece of mind it gives me:) I enjoy the look very much and my concern was strictly to do with the health of the horn. Thanks again!
     

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