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Discussion in 'Books, Literature, and Websites' started by jbtsax, Mar 7, 2010.

  1. jbtsax

    jbtsax Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

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    My mistake. You first used the tenor neck unaltered stopped and then switched to the alto neck without a tenon stopped. Then you changed to the alto neck unstopped. It was kind of like a sax neck shell game. :)

    I did actually mistake the alto result for one of the tenor results. I will certainly read more carefully next time.

    Does your digital tuner give the reading in Hz or in cents?

    I can't imagine that airy sound from blowing across the end of the neck making audible out of tune "beats" with another fixed pitch. Are you sure about that?

    Is there any chance you could record the sound you get to an MP3 file so I can run it through my frequency analysis software? I would like to see if that gives the same exact pitch.

    I guess "no soup for me". Sorry for the "honest" mistake.

    John
     
  2. MartinMods

    MartinMods

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    Not really. The alto information was in a different posting than the tenor information, and each posting was clearly designated with, "I measured my unaltered Martin tenor neck (211.41mm)", or, "I just tested my Martin alto neck (tenon removed) via your method. Length: 169.86mm". If that's a shell game, let's start betting money.

    You must wear headphones.

    It's thought that the average person can distinguish pitch differences of 10 cents. A trained musician should be able to reach the limit of around 4.3 cents - http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Pitch_%28music%29

    Here's an interesting hearing test:

    http://audiocheck.net/blindtests_pitch.php?cent=50

    I have a trained ear, both as a musician and a recording engineer, so I can tell if 2 sequential tones are perfectly in tune, close and will beat slightly, or too out of tune for musical use. I'll see if I can make a recording of both sounds together, so you can maybe hear what I hear, if you really think that is necessary.

    I really suggest that you try to use your ears first when doing your own testing. You can also hear the pitch of your neck by holding the small end 1" from your ear, and tapping the side of the tenon with your finger. If you cover 1/4 of the large end, the pitch will drop about 100 cents. Alternate between open and partially closed to see if you can hear a difference.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2010
  3. MartinMods

    MartinMods

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    I'll try to record some samples and filter out the noise.

    You could use an adjustable oscillator and tune it to match the played frequency, as best you can by ear. That should be good enough.
     
  4. jbtsax

    jbtsax Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

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    How about that MP3 recoring of your played pitch to see whether you are blowing air or just smoke?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 16, 2010
  5. MartinMods

    MartinMods

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    No insult intended. Just a matter-of-fact, test your own neck by blowing on it or tapping on it. If you can't hear the pitch, even enough to tell if you are in the ball park, you can't hear the pitch. If that insults you, well, too bad. They are your ears, not mine.
     
  6. jbtsax

    jbtsax Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

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    Ball park doesn't quite measure up when you are using a formula to find the exact frequency in Hz based upon the wavelength. How about some sound files to demonstrate what you are saying is true? That is the question on the table, not how good my ears are.
     
  7. MartinMods

    MartinMods

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    If I have time to make a recording, I will, but I really don't feel obligated to do so. I can clearly hear that the pitch is over a semi-tone off, from the calculated frequency, so I thought I would help you out with that information. That much should suffice, I think. It certainly put the issue to rest in my mind. If you need more proof than that this second, you will have to do your own testing. Or you can just discount my postings. I don't care.
     
  8. jbtsax

    jbtsax Distinguished Member Distinguished Member

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    Thanks Lance. That certainly answers my question. I have done my own testing and have posted the results on the mouthpiece forum. By adding an end correction I found a good agreement with the "airy tone" pitch given by my Korg tuner and the calculated frequency of the open ended neck. I am going to try to recreate that with the neck from my Yomama Custom tenor. I will keep you posted.
     
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