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Étude books

TMHeimer

Tom Heimer
I went through my pile of clarinet books and came up with these--would highly recommend any of them:
Opperman...…
Master Studies, Modern Daily Studies, 3 books called Velocity Studies
Jean Jean--2 books of etudes
Alfred Uhl-- 48 Studies
all the Rudolph Jettel "Accomplished Clarinetist" books (3,4?)
Victor Polatschek--48 Studies
John P. Russo--20 Modern Studies
Frantisek Zitek-- 16 Modern Studies (this one is wild)

I know it's an old thread, but maybe this will be of help to someone else.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
One of the really nice things when you're talking about woodwind instruments is that most of them are at least 100 years old, so resurrecting an old thread really isn't a problem :).
 

TMHeimer

Tom Heimer
One of the really nice things when you're talking about woodwind instruments is that most of them are at least 100 years old, so resurrecting an old thread really isn't a problem :).
Yeah I guess so. I have a method book somewhere that was published in 1896. Stopped practicing it and filed it away in case it's worth something to my descendants--like maybe in 2167.

I forgot to mention in my post something I came across a year ago-- The Clarinet Institute of Los Angeles. This is an online place that has some really great method book etudes as well as solos. Lots of contemporary stuff. There is no copywrite on any of it, so I Xeroxed a whole lot of stuff to practice. Was great to get something new for a change.

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EDIT: Added a link for you.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
I'll just mention it again, because we're on the topic: if you want a particular Étude/method book, Google it. You might find it online. Use the "author's name, in quotes" then "pdf." You should also set your Google search settings (Settings > Languages and Tools > Any Language).

It took me, oh, 10 minutes to find Alfred Uhl's "48 Etüden für Klarinette."
 

TMHeimer

Tom Heimer
I always bought my books by going to a music store and flipping through them. If say, I would benefit from at least 50% of it's content, I'd buy it. Did that from about 1995-2006. Buying online may be OK. I wouldn't buy anything that didn't have PDF samples (now I'll look up once again what PDF stands for--but, I know what it is.....)
 
The 32 Etudes by Rose for clarinet. I just purchased the book and a separately a CD of a clarinet playing them with piano. I was disappointed that the CD I have did not have separate recordings for piano alone to play with. But most are too fast for me to keep up with anyhow.

Based on the above posts I did search for a free pdf download and found one. But a book is nicer to play out of.

 

TMHeimer

Tom Heimer
The 32 Etudes by Rose for clarinet. I just purchased the book and a separately a CD of a clarinet playing them with piano. I was disappointed that the CD I have did not have separate recordings for piano alone to play with. But most are too fast for me to keep up with anyhow.

Based on the above posts I did search for a free pdf download and found one. But a book is nicer to play out of.

Agree. The paper book is much better. I was just thinking to check on a site for PDF samples then if there are enough there for you to decide to buy it, try to buy the hard copy online (or in a store?). But I'm not familiar with doing that myself.
 
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