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18 Exercises, T. Berbiguier

#1
Eighteen Exercises or Etudes for Flute, by Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier.

I just picked this up yesterday, and am having a blast going through it. Taking a step back from the Karg-Elert studies, because I kinda leaped from Andersen over a bunch of things. Anyhow, he really likes low to high octave jumps, a lot. So far (up to no 9 editing, not performance ready yet), he's stayed below high G and above low D. Very tuneful.

Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier
Born: Dec 21, 1782
Town: Caderousse, France
Occupation: Flutist (as opposed to "composer" if you're wondering why I wrote that)
 
#2
Eighteen Exercises or Etudes for Flute, by Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier.

I just picked this up yesterday, and am having a blast going through it. Taking a step back from the Karg-Elert studies, because I kinda leaped from Andersen over a bunch of things. Anyhow, he really likes low to high octave jumps, a lot. So far (up to no 9 editing, not performance ready yet), he's stayed below high G and above low D. Very tuneful.

Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier
Born: Dec 21, 1782
Town: Caderousse, France
Occupation: Flutist (as opposed to "composer" if you're wondering why I wrote that)

Wonderful studies. Focus low to play high.
 
#4
...and my teacher, a Julius Baker disciple, made me play them all first completely slurred, then with articulations.
Baker turned out a lot of students. I studied under one of his as well, but I'm from Philadelphia, so I'm sure there's no shortage of them here.

Articulations south of low E. I think I'll spend today on some exercises with them. I had a day two weeks ago where low D was articulating like B in the staff. Gotta find that spot again.
 
#5
Baker turned out a lot of students. I studied under one of his as well, but I'm from Philadelphia, so I'm sure there's no shortage of them here.

Articulations south of low E. I think I'll spend today on some exercises with them. I had a day two weeks ago where low D was articulating like B in the staff. Gotta find that spot again.
Do you use "bel canto" or diaphragm support?
 
#6
Do you use "bel canto" or diaphragm support?
I'm not sure what "bel canto" is, so I'm gonna say diaphram support. I've been practicing terribly lately by putting the music flat on a desk instead of on a stand. Shame on me.

I'm in the process of moving my embrouchure slightly forward, this seems to be assisting speaking in all registers, and also taking out some wind noise.
 
#7
You do exercises to expand your chest cavity/lung capacity. Fill it up. Relax to varying degrees and the air comes out with all the pressure needed for the flute embouchure's resistance.
 
#8
You do exercises to expand your chest cavity/lung capacity. Fill it up. Relax to varying degrees and the air comes out with all the pressure needed for the flute embouchure's resistance.
Well then definitely diaphram. I think I push a little more than classical flute players, probably because I've played in front of Jazz trumpets all my life, or next to electric guitars. It's really a losing battle.
 
#11
Tin maybe.....brass I think. Nothing special about it in that regard, though I did work on the embouchure hole. That added another $2000.00 value at least.
 
#12
Tin maybe.....brass I think. Nothing special about it in that regard, though I did work on the embouchure hole. That added another $2000.00 value at least.
Well, you're changing my view of metal piccolos. I've heard mixed reviews on material vs sound, some say it matters, some say it doesn't. I always thought a metal piccolo was best in a marching environment, or as a lamp post. However, the recording we listened to before was nicely in tune and even though the recording quality reflects the time, it's not shrill or overbearing. I'm pretty sure most piccolo players in pits or orchestras use a grenadilla piccolo (although I could be wrong), but you seem to have found something that suits you.
 
#13
Well, you're changing my view of metal piccolos. I've heard mixed reviews on material vs sound, some say it matters, some say it doesn't. I always thought a metal piccolo was best in a marching environment, or as a lamp post. However, the recording we listened to before was nicely in tune and even though the recording quality reflects the time, it's not shrill or overbearing. I'm pretty sure most piccolo players in pits or orchestras use a grenadilla piccolo (although I could be wrong), but you seem to have found something that suits you.
I don't think there are any significant deficiencies in the German recording qualities of the 80's, rather the VHS capture/digital conversion, and compression algorithms of today required for youtube video streaming.
 
#14
I don't think there are any significant deficiencies in the German recording qualities of the 80's, rather the VHS capture/digital conversion, and compression algorithms of today required for youtube video streaming.
Well yea, it's definitely a compression thing, not in the musical sense, but in reducing the bit rate to fit into onto a specifically sized recording apparatus, whatever that may be. Anyhow, still sounds good.
 
#15
Well yea, it's definitely a compression thing, not in the musical sense, but in reducing the bit rate to fit into onto a specifically sized recording apparatus, whatever that may be. Anyhow, still sounds good.
While I think it's fine for the commercial orchestra (it matches the thinner/brighter sounding Wurlitzer bass clarinet and balances the edgier Caliccio-ish trumpets - I played Selmer BC) I would certainly use a conical bore instrument in a more critical classical setting, wood or metal.
 
#16
....and to differentiate, close-miked studio/live recording is entirely different than playing live. The engineer is not concerned with how the instruments blend in the room, rather, what presence they have through his speakers in his sound field. They should be full-toned enough to sound good alone, but not so fat sounding that they obscure other instruments placed next to them, spacially or spectrally.

That has a great deal to do with why the MK6 was/is so successful. It has a tight, compact, bright core tone that sounds great, clean and precise, yet full and expressive, in recorded medium. I once tried using the Yamaha 62 tenor with a Lawton 7*B mouthpiece in a live TV recording. The guy next to me was using a Mk6. The engineer let me know that no matter how he eq'd my signal, he couldn't get it to have the same clarity/presence in the mix as the Selmer. A quick horn switch and everything was fine.
 
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