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Buffet-Powell

Ed

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#1
A few weeks back when dropping off my bari at my tech's shop he showed me a Buffet-Powell that came in for repair. These are pretty rare horns and it's the first one I've ever seen in the flesh. The action felt pretty nice and the low C# was very easy to operate because of the way they angeled the rod. Unfortunately the horn was unplayable. Did I mention the TWO octave pips on the neck!

Pete did a nice write up at saxpics some years ago along with all of the pictures I wish I would have taken if I had time:

http://saxpics.com/buffet/buffet-powell.htm
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
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#2
Something I didn't mentioned is that there was also a variant of these horns that had the keywork on "the normal way". I think I had one or two pics of those.

<Checks archives.> Yah. 3275x-ish and the lower stack is more "normal".
 

Ed

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#3
Interesting. The one I saw was the interesting keywork. My tech is the guy who gave you the cool Buffet soprano photos. Maybe it was the Apogee?
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
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#4
No, I think you've just accidentally confused yourself, Ed. Remember, I'M the one that's supposed to be taking the Class 1 narcotic pain meds.

(BTB, for the examples below, click the pictures for a larger view.)

Here's the lower stack on an "early" Buffet-Powell tenor. Note how the F, E and D are "connected" (I'd prefer the term "hinged") on the right side of the horn (as you play). That's the "abnormal" side. Later Buffet-Powells are hinged on the left side of the horn, as are most other saxophones. Yes, the connector rods swapped sides of the horn! However, considering the B-P horns are so uncommon, it took me a long time to get the pictures to confirm that, thus I had never written it up.

The Apogee System is a completely different thing. My writeup is still available here.

===============

On a completely different topic, the Haynes-Schwelm horns -- hey, just speaking of another flute manufacturer's name -- are nothing more than 1970's Mexiconn student horns.
 
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