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Can you switch a lower joint between models?

I have a Yamaha YCL-23N B flat clarinet. Finally took it down to play again for the first time in years and promptly upended the case – the clarinet parts fell onto my tile floor and I chipped one end of the lower joint. I had it repaired and while the pitch isn't as great as it used to be, the horn still plays fairly well, but I was wondering, if I found a lower joint from a different model (this is such a beginner question), would it fit my clarinet? Looking online so I can't just try it on.
Many thanks.
 
Number one, I wouldn't buy a replacement lower joint of a different model period whether online or from a store. Now on to the other dozen or so reasons "not to". There's a 50/50 chance you'd need a re-cork to get the lower joint to fit tight. It may also need pads. Bore might be different size and length of the joint could be different. Keys might need alignment. Oh, and you need to ask, "Why are you selling just the lower joint?"
You say it's been years since you "took it down", the dropped it, had it repaired and it plays fairly well but pitch is not as good. My advice, play it as is until you decide you're not going to "put it away" again, then go look for a more intermediate clarinet.
 
The "chip" on the lower joint is more-than-likely located on the male-tenon-side (where the bell attaches).
1.5 years ago I purchased a "used" wooden clarinet that has a chip in the same area. The chip does not ill-affect the tone/intonation.

Regarding the pitch:
Since you haven't played in years your pitch issue may be related to your embouchure.
Try this: just play your mouthpiece, the pitch (squeak) that you produce should be a "high C" (concert pitch)
If it's lower than high C that will cause pitch issues (amongst a million other things).

I hope this helps.
 
The "chip" on the lower joint is more-than-likely located on the male-tenon-side (where the bell attaches).
1.5 years ago I purchased a "used" wooden clarinet that has a chip in the same area. The chip does not ill-affect the tone/intonation.

Regarding the pitch:
Since you haven't played in years your pitch issue may be related to your embouchure.
Try this: just play your mouthpiece, the pitch (squeak) that you produce should be a "high C" (concert pitch)
If it's lower than high C that will cause pitch issues (amongst a million other things).

I hope this helps.
Didn't know that about the mouthpiece (I'm self-taught) but the horn's pitch has improved as I practise, so probably it was about getting my embouchure back. So yes, it does help, thanks.
 
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