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Happy 100th Birthday to this.

I had almost forgotten and 2015 is coming to a close. I bought this horn a number of years back and sort of thought how cool it would be to have a Centenarian Saxophone.

I cant remember if I bought this for $300 or $400 from Junkdude. Anyway, here are some pics of the original www.Junkdude.com ad from which I bought it. I'll try to take some of my own a bit later, but it's the beginning of my time off work and I wanted to get this out of the way before going to sleep. It is my only bari and I thought I would share it will you all. Serial Number is 262XX

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Hats off to our admins for making the upload so intuitive!

So this has, or will turn a hundred years old this year. On to 101!!!
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Hey, it's one of the few Bueschers with beveled tone holes, too. I don't think I've seen a Buescher bari with BTH before.
 

TrueTone

College Student who likes wind instruments & music
I think my name is enough to show that I'm jealous.
Unfortunately for me, I won't be in ownership of my Buescher in its' centenary year, as it's my school's.
Hopefully I'll find a tenor I like as much before I graduate.
 

Helen

Content Expert Saxophones
Staff member
Administrator
Congrats on your baby reaching 100. My TT bass has a few more years to go before it hits 100. It was made in 1922. It's still going strong, and is my one and only bass. (The only voice of sax I can say that about.) :emoji_rage:
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
But your E&S bari is older, right?

As far as Buescher basis are concerned, I'd love to try one of the "transitional" Custom Built series. I rather liked a gold-plated TT bari I tried out, once. Too bad that it didn't go to low A.
 

TrueTone

College Student who likes wind instruments & music
Well neither does the Custom Built.
I'd want to see how much they sold for with that.
I'd like to try one also, though I doubt I can unless either I find one locally or I find one that someone owns.
Anyone want to chime in on how different it is in a playing perspective from the standard 129?
 

Helen

Content Expert Saxophones
Staff member
Administrator
But your E&S bari is older, right?
Yes by Evette & Schaeffer/Buffet is circa 1886 & in remarkable condition. If I can ever get the double octave key mechanism figured out well enough, it would be a fun horn to play.

I jammed playing it at the big show I put on with my jazz trio this past February this year to celebrate Adolphe Sax's 200th b-day because I figured I'd fall on my face due to the lack of automatic octave key. I'm just not fluid enough on it to play as convincingly on it as I do on more modern horns. The bari did go to the show though as one of the 2 "exhibit" horns.

In this photo you can see the neck and pig tail behind my Mark VI bari and in front of Buescher bass. Yes, there is a size difference between it and modern baris--mostly in part because it's a HP horn--made more noticeable here because it's sitting in a K&M tenor stand, since that's the only stand that will safely cradle the bell.

Heavy-Metal.jpg
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
You ~could~ have your repair tech convert it into an automatic mechanism. I have to say that I didn't really own my Couesnon bari (IIRC, 1908) long enough to really play with the dual-key system. At least, not long enough for me to get a good or bad impression.

========

Yah, I know the Custom Built also goes down to only Bb. Doesn't mean I wouldn't like trying one!
 

TrueTone

College Student who likes wind instruments & music
I'd like to play one in a band if I liked it.
...why do composers love writing low As? It makes me outdated.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Because they sound awesome. You also have to remember that A. Sax had some low A horns in his inventory, so it's not that new to have a low A. Hey, even if you say that the Selmer Super (Balanced) Action was the first low A bari produced, that's 1952.

I still remember the day that I sat down in the orchestra I played in. The trombonist had just bought a nice, shiny new bass trombone. Well, I had a shiny YBS-52 and I had just bought a Berg Larsen (rubber) mouthpiece. I think we were on more than equal terms for low-end volume.

FWIW, one of the reasons I wanted a low A is because I played a lot of classical music. Low A on a bari is concert C. I could play some cello parts as written. (Standard trick: transpose bass clef to Eb treble instrument. Add three sharps to the key signature and just change the clef. So, :BassClef::Space2: becomes :TrebleClef::Space2: and your key signature goes from C to A ... if I had actually installed the key signature smileys ...)
 
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