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How to connect a clarinet with my speakrs and AV reciever?

Hi guys, not that i don't understand from the IT or technique, but as a newbie from the musician part, i would like to ask how to play with my clarinet and the sound that comes out from it to be transmited through my speakers that i have them home?

I have JBL speakers connected with Harman Kardon AVR 1510 (AV Reciever). Is there possibility to achive this? IF NOT, please tell me what kind of equipment i need to buy in order to achive that.

Your time, suggestions and solutions are appriciated for me!

What i want to achive?

i would like to achive a clarinet sound like this from this video:


and


i would also like for your opinions on what kind of clarinets are used in this song. This is a folklore national music of Greece, more correctly Epirus region.
 

Carl H.

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
Best analog would be to buy a mixer, an XLR cable and a good microphone and use an RCA out into one of your RCA ins on your receiver.

Here are some bare minimums to get a decent quality:
mixer
XLR
microphone
RCA

If you want cheap and dirty get an old cassette deck and plug a mic into the front of it and set it to record and hit pause, send the signal into your receiver and you'll get sound out of your speakers. You could probably do this used locally for less than the cost of a decent microphone.
 
Best analog would be to buy a mixer, an XLR cable and a good microphone and use an RCA out into one of your RCA ins on your receiver.

Here are some bare minimums to get a decent quality:
mixer
XLR
microphone
RCA

If you want cheap and dirty get an old cassette deck and plug a mic into the front of it and set it to record and hit pause, send the signal into your receiver and you'll get sound out of your speakers. You could probably do this used locally for less than the cost of a decent microphone.
WOW, this was well explained brother, i appriciate your answer, but i think i saw something like a magnet or something that they attach it on the end of the clarinet where the sound comes out... or some cable in the clarinet.
I wanna say, that i don't want to be positioned in one place, i wanna move around with the clarinet...
Here take a look here...
What is this? And do you know what kind of clarinets they use in the previous videos?
 
Last edited:

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Obvious joke: I don't know. It's all Greek to me.

Anyhow,

In the Ράστ- Μωραΐτικο- Αρβανιτοβλάχικο ΠΛΑΣΤΗΡΑΣ ΠΑΝΟΣ video, there's a cable that's going from the mouthpiece or barrel. There are a bunch of different ways of putting a microphone on a woodwind, and one popular on a saxophone (it's what I have the most experience with seeing mics on) is to drill a hole in the neck and attach the mic there (a rather excessive example can be seen here). However, I've seen more woodwinds with a microphone clamped on to the bell and another that hangs at about the horn's mid-point. That's because a woodwind's sound comes out from the toneholes under what you're playing, rather than the bell, unless you're playing with all your fingers down. Here's a random video that shows a couple different clarinet micing options.

As far as getting that kind of sound, in the video directly above this post, the microphone output is going to some kind of effects processor. @Helen uses some, so she's got more details than I do, but you could easily do microphone -> guitar effects pedal -> amplifier. So, someone standing right next to you would hear some clarinet sound, but anyone in the audience is just going to hear what's coming through the amp.

I very briefly listened to the topmost two videos. #1 sounds like a bit of digital delay, which you can easily get from an effects pedal, a rack-mount processor, or even through a (well, some) audio mixers. #2 sounds more like the Ράστ video, so I'll just refer to my above comment. If you're asking what brand of clarinet, I have no idea. If you're asking what pitch, it's a soprano. They're available in Bb, C, A, D, and G, but D is almost extinct and Bb is what most people play. I really can't tell which pitch clarinet the player is using, as they're all not terribly different in size. The clarinets in the link I just posted have Albert System (simple system) fingering. That's what the guy in the Ράστ video is using. The Albert System clarinet is uncommon, these days, and most people use Boehm system, instead.
 

Carl H.

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
Some further resources for collecting the sound from your clarinet:



I have no first hand knowledge of either of these pickup systems.


If you do not want your movement to be restricted by a wire, Line 6 makes some fine wireless setups.

There are advantages and disadvantages whichever system you use. Mics will need a preamplifier to run effects, pickups are seldom high fidelity, wireless frees you from the cable but can strangle you with battery life issues at the worst times while wires limit your ability to move around while playing.

Are you still wanting to run through consumer level home audio gear or are you prepared to get amplification specifically designed for amplifying musical instruments?
 

saxhound

Moderator
Staff member
CE/Moderator
Are you still wanting to run through consumer level home audio gear or are you prepared to get amplification specifically designed for amplifying musical instruments?
This is the big question. Home audio equipment is not designed for the wide variance in input gain and volume of live performance. It typically lacks the proper input types (XLR and 1/4"), and is designed for only one input at a time, which eliminates the ability to play along with backing tracks or other musicians. An improper setup could also fry your amplifier and / or your speakers. If you don't want to buy a mixer and speakers, there are a number of small to medium size powered PA speakers that have 3 or 4 inputs - effectively a mini mixer built in. Check out the QSC CP-8 or CP-12 as an example.
 
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