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Innovation: Saxophones with new lacquer finish

Gandalfe

Admin and all around good guy.
Staff member
Administrator
The “urushi” lacquer-coated instruments are the brainchild of Yurie Akaiwa, 26, who studied lacquer craft at University of Toyama’s Faculty of Art and Design. Although difficult at first to apply lacquer on a saxophone made of brass, she devised creative measures and succeeded in bringing out unexpected effects.

NewSaxLacquerFinish.PNG


Read more: http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/A...ISF5f5xEIQfBNsaENbITl-WeeiVPUwc-7srjrm3vqeD80
 

Steve

Clarinet CE/Moderator
Staff member
CE/Moderator
Just some clarification.
they've been lacquering saxophones / brass instruments for a very, very long time.
This is a process of adding designs and other coloration to the instrument under/including in the lacquer.

Ms. Akaiwa is also undergoing a study on how lacquer affects the tonal qualities of instruments.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
This is a process of adding designs and other coloration to the instrument under/including in the lacquer.
I never knew that was a problem. That's my new thing I learned today.

I've seen lots of painted saxophones. There were also the interesting patterns that you could get on the 1990s-era LA Sax horns. These use automotive paint, which really isn't too far from the enamel used on Conn and Buescher horns back in the 1920s, which occasionally got pretty elaborate.

I'll be interested to see the "tonal quality" study and methodology. I'm definitely bookmarking this page!
 

Steve

Clarinet CE/Moderator
Staff member
CE/Moderator
I never knew that was a problem. That's my new thing I learned today.

I've seen lots of painted saxophones. There were also the interesting patterns that you could get on the 1990s-era LA Sax horns. These use automotive paint, which really isn't too far from the enamel used on Conn and Buescher horns back in the 1920s, which occasionally got pretty elaborate.

I'll be interested to see the "tonal quality" study and methodology. I'm definitely bookmarking this page!
at one time a long time ago I in my hands a Selmer-Paris analysis of lacquers, various brasses and such as they were developing their Reference horns.
Lost it. So I've kept my mouth shut on those threads about that stuff over the years.
 
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