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Looking for some technical help with Peavey powered amp heads

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#1
I'm at a turning point in the fabrication of my new sound system, and am looking for a little help/guidance.

My plan is to semi-permanently install my Peavey XR684F mixer head into a rolling cabinet. Adequate ventilation will be provided, and the head will be secured in place within the cabinet structure.

However, I would like to remove the handle from the one end, the better to center and secure the mixer in place.

The handle is a strap affair, rubber casing over a metal strap, and it is secured through the case at either end by a Phillips head machine screw driven through the handle and into the case body.

I could, of course, just pull the two screws. However, I have no way of telling how they are secured within the cabinet of the mixer, and am afraid that I might be dropping some nuts down into the cabinet where they might short something out.

I would open the cabinet if only I knew which of the myriad of machine screws on the thing would allow me to do that. It shouldn't be complicated, but there's no way of telling without a service manual that addresses such issues. The one available is limited to a bill of materials plus a series of circuit diagrams - nothing about the cabinet at all.

I'd take it to the local repair facility for Peavey products (Evans Music, out on Westheimer Road), but they have a $60.00 minimum charge, and that seems a bit steep if all that needs to be done is to pull a couple of machine screws out of a pair of internal T nuts.

Does anybody hereon know anything about the Peavey XR68XX series of mixers? Any help here will be greatly appreciated.
 

tictactux

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
#2
Back one screw two turns out. If the nut (or whatever it is) inside is not secured, the head will stay where it is (and you'll back out the nut), else you will see the screw coming out. If the sides of the cabinet are wood, chances are that there are tee nuts inside. (or your two handle screws are ordinary wood screws)

Do NOT push too hard but they will stay put long enough that as soon as you got the handle away you can fasten the two screws again.

If the screw does not come out, then the nuts inside are unsecured which should definitely not be the case as a handle screw coming loose is not an unheard-of phenomenon...
 

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#3
As the thing is built like the last tank that I didn't have driven over a expedient mine, I imagine that the nuts pictured above are what is used, but I can't get a clear sight line to that part of the case to see. Worse comes to worse, I can take it in and pay the $60.00. Stay tuned.
 

tictactux

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
#4
Worse comes to worse, I can take it in and pay the $60.00. Stay tuned.
Why don't you ring up the guys and ask if it's safe to remove the handle screws? Worst that can happen is that they say an expert has to do it for $60... ;-)
 

Carl H.

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
#5
Or just do it and see if it rattles after. If it does, take it apart yourself and remove the offending fastener. If you can't reassemble it, pay the guys to put it back together for you - it should be a simple task for them and you are not out any additional cash at that point anyway.

I don't imagine this to be much of a challenge to disassemble or re assemble as it is a metal chassis in a wooden shell.
 

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#6
The suspicion that the handle was installed with machine screws threaded into T-nuts on the interior of the XR 684 L shell was correct.

As suggested, I took the "back a screw out a little" approach, and the indication was that the screw was run through somthing solid, such as a T-nut. I then backed out the one T-nut, slipped the handle materials out of the way, and ran the machine screw back through the shell and T-nut and made it up tight to the shell. I then repeated with the other screw, leaving the shell nude and smooth and ready to slot into place.

My thanks to all who chimed in on this one. My sound system cabinet is one step closer to realization.
 

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#7
One of the problems encountered...

...with the "take it apart" suggestion is that there is a myriad (a myriad, I tell ya!) of screws all over the outside, back and (a few on the) front of the mixer. I almost loosened a screw that was just made up against the back. Had I loosened stuff up too much, it would have been one item rattling around and still no solution to getting inside.

I had eyed the four pairs of screws and thought about starting the process with eight to sixteen potential errors. Shudder...

I'm big on "First, do no harm" principle when it comes to messing with stuff. Thus, my reluctance. Thankfully, I will have no such problems.
 

Carl H.

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
#9
Power screwdrivers can be your best friend, if you know what you are doing.

Sawzall, Retread? :emoji_rage:
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
#12
We could add British motorcycles to this thread ....
 

SOTSDO

Old King Log
Staff member
CE/Moderator
#13
I used to use an MG to tool around in Kentucky with the girlfriend. It belonged to a friend of mine when I was in the service; he got sent TDY to then-Camp Drum in New York, and he trusted me to keep the battery charged up.

Compared to the cheapest of cheap Japanese imports, it would hold the road very well. However, it was an ordeal to keep it all in order.

Somewhere, there is a huge internet page of jokes about English cars and Lucas, including an eBay ad for "genuine Lucas smoke", in case all of the smoke had escaped from your electrical system. It was complete with questions from those interested in the auction, asking if it could be used with Italian cars and so forth.

It would be hilarious, if it weren't so frequent an occurrence.

And then, there's my daughter. She had a perfectly good Toyota Venza, which she traded in to buy a second hand, high end Jaguar. The thing was such a piece of junk that electrical items like switches and gauges and lights were falling out of the dashboard. But, put the top down and drive around, and did she get the admiring glances...
 
#15
Thanks for the tip, Terry. I searched out a few Lucas joke sites.

"If Lucas made guns, wars would not start."
"Vacuum cleaners are the only Lucas products that don't suck."
 
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