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New Professional Sax Pricing Info

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
* I'm just compiling the list. Feel free to mention any manufacturer that has a professional line -- or, for that matter, any model I've forgotten -- and I'll try to update this list on occasion.

* Note that each make/model may be available in different materials or have other available finishes/options. I took the lowest price I could find for an example of each model.

* Note that I didn't shop around for prices. You may be able to find something cheaper/more expensive. Hey, it's a guide.

* Note that I converted EURO and BRITISH POUND prices into US DOLLARS using xe.com. Just trying to be consistent.

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EDIT (10/21/2009): I've now made this into a PDF, included a few more manufacturers and included ALL pitches (see post #24). I'll include the PDF here, too.

-> Last updated 10/22/2009 @ 15:46 Arizona Time
 

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Ironically, I am in the market for a pro alto as soon as my OSAP comes in!

(I'm going for the Jupiter 2069 or a P. Mauriat)
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Ironically, I am in the market for a pro alto as soon as my OSAP comes in!

(I'm going for the Jupiter 2069 or a P. Mauriat)
I think I'd still go vintage. Hey, $1900 US can buy anything from a Selmer Mark 7 to a Yamaha 62 -- if you look hard enough. Hey, this YAS-61 is cheap enough to afford a really, really good overhaul, too. Or how 'bout an overhauled SML-made King Marigaux for just $100 more?
 
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pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
OSAP = Ontario Student Assistance Plan?

I recommend the Selmer Ref series horns. Try them too when you start looking. And make sure they don't cost more than they do at Kessler Music. :cool:
That's 2 - 3x as much as we're talking 'bout, Jim.

I've not played the Reference horns. I know I'm not good enough of a sax player -- at this point, at least -- to be able to tell how good/bad they are: I have to count on the reviews of others.
 
Funny, I was just eyeballing/noodling around on a Jupiter (869?) and a Selmer Kookabura alto at my local shop; if I hadn't known better, I would have said the Jupiter was the better quality alto of the two.

Kessler is getting some rave reviews from knowledgeable players about his top line model from Vietnam.

Soooo many choices!
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Kessler is getting some rave reviews from knowledgeable players about his top line model from Vietnam.
I thought they were from Taiwan.

Hey, Dave. You're a member, here. Drop us a line!
 
Seriously? Not sure I buy into the Jupiter having better quality than the Selmer. YMMV is certainly in effect here.
Me neither! I said "if I didn't know better." What I'm saying is that, on a fairly superficial comparison, the huge difference in price would have been hard to figure. I think the Jupiter was set up better, and, more, the action of the left pinky cluster worked a little better for me and the palm keys were a little closer to where I'd like them.

The funny thing is: the only alto I've ever played seriously was a Superaction 80 (ser I).

Hey Pete

RE Kessler's very popular horns:

http://www.saxontheweb.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=672881&highlight=vietnam#post672881
 
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IMO it's very important for someone to buy a saxophone they like. At least for decent and above players (for beginners, decent and functional is most important). So although "go vintage" or "recommend the Selmer Ref series horns" can be good to try, these might not be the saxophones a person would like. Buying something to supposedly get more for your money can be a good idea, but getting more of something you don't really like is not.

For example, I just worked on a Selmer Reference 36 tenor a few days ago. Actually it was interesting enough that I will add a review about it on my website. I found two main things. First, it was really an excellent saxophone (good intoantio, tone, feel). Second, that it is definitely not a saxophone I would buy if I was looking for a tenor, because it wasn't what I like.

WoodwindDoubler suggested Mauriat (I'm considering becoming a dealer), so to show how varied this can be, I was recently with two players who were trying the Mauriat tenors models 66 and 76. Both are very high level players in their style. Both agreed that both models were very good, but, one liked the 66 model a lot more. The other player thought exactly the opposite, and liked the 76 model much more. They just prefer a different type of tone and feel from a saxophone.

Re Jupiter better quality than Selmer: Jupiter has pretty good quality for the higher models, and they are relatively consistent IME. Selmers are pretty unpredictable in quality and I have seen anything from excellent to all sorts of problems you'd never expect for this price. I always recommend to buy a specific saopxhone, not just same model, but with some companies (like Selmer) it's even more important.
 

Groovekiller

Distinguished Member
Distinguished Member
Seriously? Not sure I buy into the Jupiter having better quality than the Selmer. YMMV is certainly in effect here.
Those Selmer Paris "collector" instruments with the bird engravings are great horns with wonderful engraving. I wish I had one.
I will say, however, that the store where I work has returned more than one Selmer Paris saxophone, including one of the high end engraved models, because I told the owner that it didn't play well. No real factory errors, it just wasn't up to the price. We sell enough Selmers that the distributor puts up with my complaints.

Buy a horn where you can try it out first or where you can return it for a full refund. For me, the back and forth shipping isn't worth the savings. When I fall in love with a saxophone, I want to buy the horn I tried.

As many horns as I've owned, only a few were puchased new, and when I was willing to spend that much money, I wasn't willing to cut costs by buying blind. Not everyone feels the same way, obviously.
 
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pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Well, either everyone's right ... or everyone's partially right: says, "Parts from Taiwan, assembled in Vietnam" in that thread. However, considering the quote is not Dave Kessler himself and I don't own one, YMMV.

I'll also mention this again: it doesn't really matter where the horn is from, as long as it plays well. In the case of the Kesslers, IIRC (and I may not), they've been favorably compared to Yanagisawa 901s.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Buy a horn where you can try it out first or where you can return it for a full refund. For me, the back and forth shipping isn't worth the savings. When I fall in love with a saxophone, I want to buy the horn I tried.
+1. I heartily approve of this post.

A few -- not all -- vintage dealers also offer you the option to try a horn and send it back if you don't like it. All you have to do is pay for shipping. IMO, if the choice you have is (say) a $7000 Selmer you can try at the shop and a (say) $2000 SML that can be shipped to you and back to the dealer for an extra $200, try the SML. You might like that SML as much or more than the Selmer and you'll spend a lot less $.
 
Soooo many choices!
This was really my point.

With the exchange rate almost even, for Canadian buyers like WWD, this sure does seem like a great time either to buy new from an American seller like Dave Kessler, or to scour the vintage horn market in the states. I'm sure there are some killer deals out there, perhaps especially on altos.

Rory
 
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