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Wilmington Low C by Music Medic

I have searched all over the internet for a few days now and can't find any independent reviews of the Wilmington Low C bass clarinet by Music Medic.

It looks like a great horn. It's about 1,000 dollars more than the Kessler, which is highly reviewed. But the Wilmington pictures look like it might be a better horn, for example it's got 6 right hand pinky keys vs. the Kessler's 5; and the low D, Db, and C keys have rollers which the Kessler does not. Finally, the Wilmington is a composite of Granadilla wood and hard rubber. I'm interested in what anyone on this forum knows about the Wilmington. I have messaged Musicmedic both on Facebook and in an email, but have not received a response. That in itself could be a bad omen (?)
 
You sort of wrote a mini review :) These probably haven't been around long enough to generate a review. I know they just came out with a Bari also (I probably read that here)

What's the apparent tone hole in the Bell in pic #2? None of the photos give a good view of those rollers, that is one feature I would like to have a better view of.

To me, the most important features of a woodwind instrument is free blowing, good intonation, good build quality & good ergonomics.

From what I've seen, they enjoy a good reputation. Isn't this the source of the roo pads? I would call them on the phone.
 
Yea, I'm going to post a separate message about that tone hole in the bell. Thanks for the input, though. When I'm sure I want to spend 3+ grand on a horn I'm going to call them, and possible drive up there, which is not really an option with the Kessler as they are on the other side of the country from me.
 
Looks like the Wilmington has RH 3 thumb keys. Probably low D, C#, C. There is a RH pinky low D And I think a LH pinky low D.

The arrangement of extended note keys are not standardized. They vary between brands and within the same brand over time. A left pinky low D is the most common but sometimes it does not work well. My 1st gen Kessler had a bad one but it had a great feeling RH thumb D. I wish my Selmer had a D thumb but it has good RH and LH pinky low Ds.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
It's got some interesting mechanics on the lower joint.

I don't think you could go wrong with either Kessler or MusicMedic. I would really like to play them side-by-side, though. I'll also note that most people will never need range to low C and you can save an awful lot of $ if you can't justify that low C.

I'm definitely interested in the grenadilla / rubber mix. It sounds promising.
 
It's got some interesting mechanics on the lower joint.

I don't think you could go wrong with either Kessler or MusicMedic. I would really like to play them side-by-side, though. I'll also note that most people will never need range to low C and you can save an awful lot of $ if you can't justify that low C.

I'm definitely interested in the grenadilla / rubber mix. It sounds promising.
I hear you on the needlessness of the Low C, but the difference between the 2 Kesslers (Eb and C) is only $150. And then there's the fun factor of learning the low notes and just playing them for the benefit of adding a little more fullness to the clarinet section in the band. Imagine that nice soft Low C holding up the bottom of the chord, just barely audible.

Anyway, Music Medic is only a few hours drive from me, so I think I'll go up there and play one to ensure that it blows freely all the way through and is in tune with itself. And who knows? Maybe they'll negotiate. Would sure like to hear from someone who owns one here in the forum.

Thanks so much for your input.
 
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Helen

Content Expert Saxophones
Staff member
Administrator
...... I'll also note that most people will never need range to low C and you can save an awful lot of $ if you can't justify that low C.

.....

I have a vintage low Eb bass. I couldn't justify a low C when I first got back into playing a number of years ago. Problem is, I am one of those people who could use one.

I do a lot of pit stuff--at least Pre-COVID I did--and a lot of pit orchestra music for bass clarinet now goes down to low C.

I'm not sure if the range to low C on BC will ever be as much the norm as low A is on bari, but I suspect eventually it will work its way into more and more concert band repertoire as well.
 
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