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Do classical concerts work?

I am interested in getting a sense of how the way classical musicians present classical music ("art music") affects how audiences listen.

Mainstream discourse has circled around the lack of programming of music by women, non-binary, and composers of color and answers regarding this issue are of course welcome, but I am also interested in gaining an understanding of how the rules set in place for the audience by the concert or recital hall has affected your individual experience as a listener.

Things to discuss could be:
-What do you like/not like about classical concerts?
-Do you lose focus in classical concerts?
-Do you feel like you could be expressive as an audience member of a classical concert?
-Do you prefer to listen to classical music as an audience member or on headphones/earbuds?

Thank you for your input!
 
I love to hear classical music played well. As long as it is played well I mostly don't lose focus, but I find the presence of other members of an audience immensely distracting. I'm never really comfortable in the presence of large groups of people, and for this reason I much prefer to listen on headphones at home. This way, if I'm not satisfied with the way a piece is being presented I can just switch it off and make a cup of coffee without reducing anybody else's enjoyment.
 

Gandalfe

Admin and all around good guy.
Staff member
Administrator
I love the drama of a good classical concert, the musicians getting in place, swapping doubles, and waxing poetic ... so to speak. I love dramatic arrangements, especially of classical pieces used in recent contemporary theater/movie productions that I have seen/loved. Sometimes a concert can just be too long and please, don't put a filler piece in that is of lessor quality. I do lose focus often in concerts because I have a tendency to daydream and have like forever. I could listen to music either live or on headphones and to which is better just depends on so many factors; weather, venue, what I'm doing etc.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
I'm on record saying that I don't go to concerts because they're too pricey and, yes, I'd rather stay in my office and listen to (probably) a better orchestra/whatever with a (almost definitely) better sound system, fewer distractions, and more comfort. However, I like going to concerts. It immensely spoiled me when I was in university because I could go to something free or very low cost every night. I think this exposure influenced my rather eclectic taste in music. I fully believe in the words of professor Peter Schickele: "If it sounds good, it is good."

I will say, though, that Brahms does put me to sleep :D. I'm also not a fan of atonal music.

Mainstream discourse has circled around the lack of programming of music by women, non-binary, and composers of color and answers regarding this issue are of course welcome
Again, if it sounds good, it is good. I don't particularly care about the composer.
 
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