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Prettiest Sax of the Moment

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Posted by QuinntheEskimo on his Facebook page:

19944380_843259072497657_599517592052272566_o.jpg 19956956_843259059164325_1112778022324020965_o.jpg

These are Conn New Wonder C melodies with the rare enamel finish. Quoting myself from saxpics.com:

saxpics.com said:
CHROME FINISH was the trade name for a colored enamel finish. Available colors were red, white, blue, green, Old Rose ("dark pink") and black. This was available as an add-on for any style of plating for a mere $15 extra, in March 1922 dollars.

POLY-CHROME FINISH was the trade name for the CHROME finish, but with added "beautiful designs on bell or body of flowers, vines, etc. in various colors" and cost $25 extra, in March 1922 dollars.

I've still only seen one horn with the Poly-Chrome finish.

As Groovekiller will attest, enamel finishes were also available on the Buescher True Tone.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Because I'm still interested, I did some research:

Groovekiller mentions somewherewhere that his enamel Buescher straight alto specifically had Duco enamel.
http://utahrails.net/dupont-paint.php said:
DuPont Duco was a lacquer formula dating from 1923. It held its gloss better over time and stood up to regular washing better, and being a lacquer, took less time to dry. Duco was also more expensive.

Dulux was an enamel formula introduced in 1926. It took longer to dry (usually overnight), but was less expensive. Dulux enamel was more resilient and resistant to chipping, and was a better choice for locomotive and car running gear.
So, it looks like there's a little bit of cross-over between Conn's C melody "tenor sax neck version" ending and "alto sax neck version" beginning, which is between 1920 and 1923.

I tried to chase down nitrocellulose-based enamel paints. There are a few places that still produce them, mainly for restoration of old automobiles. Looks like it's illegal in several US states, too. Which conjures an absurd image in my mind with saxophone players meeting shady characters in dark alleys: "Yeah. I got the stuff. You got the coin? We'll refinish that baby reeeealll good."

Anyhow, there seems to be a debate between automotive collectors/restorers as to whether or not to go with newer "enamel" finishes. The newer stuff is better in just about every category ... but it's not original.
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
A little more cool looking, rather than just pretty:

Bocal2.jpg Quatre clés.jpg Sax 1.jpg Sax 2.jpg Sax 3.jpg Sax 4.jpg

From https://sites.google.com/site/saxaero/Home/saxophone-l-pages. Look at that G#/C#/B/Bb cluster and the low C/Eb keys.

I don't know if this horn was actually made in Alger -- I've done exactly zero research -- but, if so, I think that'd be the first saxophone maker I've heard of on the entire continent of Africa.
 

Helen

Content Expert Saxophones
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I don't know if this horn was actually made in Alger -- I've done exactly zero research -- but, if so, I think that'd be the first saxophone maker I've heard of on the entire continent of Africa.
It looks rather French--if not, then French-inspired for sure. Don't you think?
 

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator

pete

Brassica Oleracea
Staff member
Administrator
Well, that took a bit. Unfortunately, yes, made in France:

Capture.PNG


*Sigh*

Couesnon was a conglomeration of a bunch of companies and, depending on the year this horn was produced, it could have been stenciled by someone else. That keywork's not standard Couesnon, nor are the keyguards.
 
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